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How Pet Microchips Work and Should You Get One for Your Family Pet? 🐕‍🦺🐱


Do you have a beloved pet and want to make sure it can be identified and returned to you if they ever get lost? A pet microchip is a safe, reliable way to make sure your pet can always be traced back to you. In this comprehensive guide, we will cover everything you need to know about pet microchips, including how they work, what information they contain, and whether or not you should get one for your pet. With this comprehensive guide, you’ll have all the information you need to make an informed decision about whether or not to get a pet microchip.


How Pet Microchips Work and Should You Get One for Your Family Pet?

What is a Microchip?


A microchip for pets is a small device that is inserted under the pet's skin and contains identification information that can be used to locate the pet's owner if the pet becomes lost. The microchip is about the size of a grain of rice and is usually implanted between the shoulder blades on the back of the neck. It is a safe and permanent form of identification that can help reunite lost pets with their owners.

Everything you need to know about Microchipping your pet


Here are some things you should know about microchipping your pet:


1. It is a quick and relatively painless procedure. The chip is typically inserted using a needle and syringe, similar to a vaccine. Most pets do not show any signs of discomfort during or after the procedure.


2. The chip does not have any tracking or GPS capabilities. It can only be used to identify the pet and retrieve information about its owner.


3. The chip is not a substitute for a collar and tag. It is important to also use a collar and tag with your pet's name and your contact information in case the chip is not detected, or the scanner is not available.


4. It is a good idea to register the chip with a national database. This will ensure that your contact information is on file and can be accessed if your pet is found.


5. The chip does not require any maintenance or battery replacement. It will last the lifetime of the pet.


6. Microchipping is a reliable method of identification, but it is not foolproof. There is a small chance that the chip may not be detected by scanners, or that the information in the database may be out of date.


7. Some countries, states, and localities have laws requiring pets to be microchipped. It is a good idea to check with your local authorities to see if there are any requirements in your area.


Overall, microchipping is a simple and effective way to help ensure that your pet can be identified and returned to you if it becomes lost.


How Pet Microchips Work and Should You Get One for Your Family Pet?

How to Microchip your pet


Find a veterinarian or other trained professional to insert the chip. Many veterinarians, animal shelters, and pet stores offer microchipping services.


Make an appointment to have the chip inserted. The procedure is typically quick and can be done during a regular office visit.


Prepare your pet for the procedure. It is not necessary to sedate your pet for the microchipping procedure, but you may want to talk to your veterinarian about using a mild sedative if your pet is anxious or difficult to handle.


Bring your pet's vaccination records and any other relevant documents to the appointment.


During the procedure, the chip will be inserted under the skin using a needle and syringe. The chip is typically placed between the shoulder blades on the back of the neck.


After the chip is inserted, the veterinarian will scan the chip to ensure that it is functioning properly.


Register the chip with a national database. This will ensure that your contact information is on file and can be accessed if your pet is found.


Keep your contact information up to date. If you move or change phone numbers, be sure to update your information with the national database.


It is important to follow your veterinarian's instructions and to keep your pet's vaccination records up to date. By doing so, you can help ensure that your pet remains healthy and can be easily identified if it becomes lost.


 
 

How Pet Microchips Work and Should You Get One for Your Family Pet?

How to register microchips with a national database


To register a pet's microchip with a national database, you will need to follow these steps:

1. Obtain the microchip identification number: This number is usually provided by the veterinarian or shelter that inserted the microchip.


2. Choose a microchip registry: There are several national microchip registries in the United States, such as the American Kennel Club (AKC) Reunite, the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Universal Pet Microchip Lookup, and the HomeAgain pet recovery service. Each registry has its fees and services, so you may want to research and compare the options before deciding which one to use.


3. Enroll in the registry: Once you have chosen a registry, you will need to enroll your pet by providing the microchip identification number and your contact information. Some registries may also require additional information about your pet, such as its breed, age, and medical history.


4. Update your information: It is important to keep your contact information up to date in the registry in case your pet is lost and found. You should update your information whenever you move or change your phone number.


5. Consider microchip enrollment services: Some veterinarians and shelters offer microchip enrollment services as part of their standard procedures. If your pet was microchipped at one of these facilities, the staff might have already enrolled the microchip in a national database on your behalf. In this case, you may still want to double-check that your information is correct and up to date.


How Pet Microchips Work and Should You Get One for Your Family Pet?

Does the Shelter Microchip a pet when adopting?


Many animal shelters and rescue organizations microchip pets before they are adopted. Shelters may microchip pets as a way to help ensure that the pet can be identified and returned to its new owner if it becomes lost.


Some shelters may also microchip pets as a way to protect the investment they have made in the animal's care and to prevent the pet from being sold or used for illegal purposes.


If you are adopting a pet from a shelter, it is a good idea to ask about the microchipping policy. The shelter should be able to provide you with information about the microchip, including the identification number and how to register the chip with a national database. It is also a good idea to check with your local authorities to see if there are any requirements for microchipping in your area.


Does a Microchip have a GPS?


No, a microchip does not have GPS capabilities. It can only be used to identify the pet and retrieve information about its owner when the chip is scanned by a special device called a scanner.


It is important to note that the microchip is not a substitute for a collar and tag. It is important to also use a collar and tag with your pet's name and your contact information in case the chip is not detected, or the scanner is not available.


 
 

How Pet Microchips Work and Should You Get One for Your Family Pet?

How is the microchip detected?


A microchip is detected using a special device called a scanner. The scanner is a handheld device that is used to read the unique identification number on the microchip.


To detect a microchip, the scanner is passed over the area where the chip is located. The scanner sends a radio frequency signal that activates the chip, causing it to transmit the identification number. The scanner then receives the signal and displays the identification number on a screen.


Most microchips use a frequency of 125 kHz or 134.2 kHz. Most scanners are able to read both frequencies, but some may only be able to read one frequency. It is important to use a scanner that is compatible with the frequency of the microchip in order to accurately detect and read the chip.


Microchips are typically inserted between the shoulder blades on the back of the neck, but they can also be inserted in other locations on the body. It is important to follow the manufacturer's instructions for the proper placement of the chip.


If a microchip is not detected by a scanner, it is possible that the chip is not functioning properly or that it has migrated to a different location in the body. It is also possible that the scanner is not compatible with the frequency of the microchip or that the information in the database is out of date.



Identification Tag v. Microchip


Both identification tags and microchips are important tools for helping to ensure that a lost pet can be identified and returned to its owner. However, there are some key differences between the two methods:


1. Identification tags are visible and can be easily seen and read by anyone who finds the pet. Microchips are not visible and can only be detected and read with a special device called a scanner.


2. Identification tags can be easily removed or lost. Microchips are permanent and cannot be removed or lost.


3. Identification tags provide only limited information. They typically include the pet's name and the owner's contact information. Microchips can provide a more detailed and accurate record of the pet's identity and owner information, including the pet's breed, age, and medical history.


4. Identification tags do not require any special equipment or training to use. Anyone can read and use the information on an identification tag. Microchips can only be detected and read with a scanner, which requires specialized training and equipment.


Overall, identification tags and microchips are both important tools for helping to ensure that a lost pet can be identified and returned to its owner. It is a good idea to use both methods to provide the maximum level of protection for your pet.



 


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