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Best Places To See Spring Wildflowers in SoCal During Social Distancing!


Spring is here and wildflowers have already bloomed everywhere, and even though we are still social distancing, there are places you can go to see the beautiful wildflowers that are not crowded and you can still practice social distancing. These are locations known for spectacular annual displays of spring wildflowers in Southern California, which are all listed here.

Point Mugu State Park

9000 Pacific Coast Hwy.

Malibu, CA 90265

(310) 457-8143

Point Mugu State Park features five miles of ocean shoreline, with rocky bluffs, sandy beaches, sand dunes, rugged hills and uplands, two major river canyons and wide grassy valleys dotted with sycamores, oaks and a few native walnuts.

There are more than 70 miles of hiking trails. The park includes the jagged pinnacles of the Boney Mountains State Wilderness Area. The wildflower display along the Backbone Trail is absolutely breathtaking in Spring.


Although this park is open to local residents, you need to follow some rules, and there are no parking facilities and parking on roadways is prohibited to protect public health from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Palos Verdes Peninsula

916 Silver Spur Rd, #207

Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274

Email: info@pvplc.org

(310) 541-7613

On the Palos Verdes Peninsula, wildflowers bloom year-round, but like most Southern California locations, March and April are peak months. You may see fiddlenecks on the east side of the Chandler Preserve, where monarch butterflies hang out, as well as deerweed, poppies and more. Lupines can be seen at White Point Nature Preserve, while hiking the Mariposa, Flying Mane and Basalt trails in Palos Verdes Nature Preserve will lead you to red paintbrush. You should also find blooms of California bush sunflower, mariposa lilies and wild hyacinth across the peninsula.

Antelope Valley Poppy Preserve

15101 Lancaster Road

Lancaster, CA 93536

661-946-6092

Each spring, the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve comes alive with the seasonal surprises of the Mojave Desert Grassland habitat. The duration and intensity of colors and scents vary from year to year. The wildflower season generally lasts from as early as mid-February through May, with a variety of wildflowers creating a mosaic of color that changes daily.

Although this park is open to local residents, you need to follow some rules, and there are no parking facilities and parking on roadways is prohibited to protect public health from the COVID-19 pandemic.


Hungry Valley SVRA

Gold Hill Road near N Peace Valley Road

Gorman, CA 93243

661-248-7007

The wildflowers of Tejon Pass are world renown for their color and abundance. In spring, California Poppies, Goldfields, Lupine, Tidy Tips and other flowers turn the grassy hillsides brilliant shades of orange, yellow and purple. During wildflower season, Hungry Valley SVRA has a self-guided tour route that begins at the Visitor Center and is marked by distinctive blue and white flower signs. (Download the PDF version of the wildflower tour map.)


Although this park is open to local residents, you need to follow some rules, and there are no parking facilities and parking on roadways is prohibited to protect public health from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Chino Hills State Park

4721 Sapphire Rd.

Chino Hills, CA 91709

951-780-6222

Every season brings an unusually colorful variety of plants and flowers, offering home to plenty of nesting birds. Coyotes, deer, bobcats and other mammals are also often seen in the woodlands, scrub and grasslands. Call before you go to check the status of wildflowers.


Although this park is open to local residents, you need to follow some rules, and there are no parking facilities and parking on roadways is prohibited to protect public health from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Saddleback Butte State Park

East Avenue J and 170th Street East

Lancaster, CA 93535

(661) 946-6092

The best time to catch the wildflower is in the springtime (February through May) when wildflowers are apt to put on a beautiful display of color. Saddleback Butte State Park is also home to many once-abundant desert species such as coyotes and kit foxes, desert tortoises, jack rabbits, cottontail rabbits, ground squirrels, kangaroo rats, many kinds of snakes and lizards, and the occasional badger or skunk.


Although this park is open to local residents, you need to follow some rules, and there are no parking facilities and parking on roadways is prohibited to protect public health from the COVID-19 pandemic.